Tag: `primer` On Screen Cars

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Fan Created Art - Dave Smolski's 1/18 Scale 1955 Chevrolet Model - Two-Lane Blacktop


It's been said that "Life imitates art far more than art imitates Life" (Oscar Wilde). But what happens when art imitates' life more? I think that's where Two-Lane Blacktop fan Dave Smolski comes in. The other day I was browsing the Model Car group on Facebook and came across the model above. I had to stand back a moment and ask myself "Is that a real car or just a model?" Scary realism right? I contacted Dave on Facebook to ask if I could post this up for our readers to see. I was met with great enthusiastic. Not only did Dave share his great model. But he gave me some create photos of the build, a video (below) and some of the reference pictures. Dave says it started out as a diecast by Ertl that was completely disassembled, re-engineered and detailed. There are scratch built parts, like the headers made from Romex wire. There are also lots of parts that were modified from other sources, like the seats, tires, wheels, floor jack, etc. Let's check them out. I really like the level of detail Dave went to on the trunk. Just like in the movie the trunk lid simply lifts off. It's common for race car builders to have the trunk lift off to save weight (less hinges etc). I can say I've personally have lifted (with help) the trunk lid off a stock tri-five. They an't light. I would hope in the movie it was fiberglass. Dave mentions that in his video above that it's possible it was made of fiberglass. But notice the properly branded battery mounted in the trunk along with tools, car jack and slicks. Firestone tires. The tool box is custom built to match the one in the movie. Even down to the brand. Slightly rusted bumper. Just like in the movie. Now we're looking above from over the engine compartment with the hood-flipped forward. You can see the power-house 454 Chevy Big Block front and center. Dual quads on the top with a tunnel ram intake. I like the detail of the headers flowing under the firewall. The plug-wires are poring out over the engine and all neatly routed to the plugs. Close shot from the passenger side. You can see the working doors and door jams. I really like the weathering work on the primer like paint coat. Not to mention the sweet sliding windows. Just like in the movie. Another shot from the side looking into the interior of the model car. Dave spent a lot of time on the seat belts. Note the realistic carpet covering floor-boards. You can also see the header collector in this view as well. Here's a build shot. Doesn't it remind you of someone working in their garage on the real thing? Almost forgot. Be sure to watch the video above for the full experience with diorama! Amazing detail and realism. I would like to thank Dave for sharing. You can see more photos on his Photo Bucket. If you have an On Screen Car related project you would like to share. Shoot us email via our contact page! Color Me Gone!

First Look: Ghostbusters ECTO 1


1959 Cadillac Ambulance must be the ideal ghost busting machine! At least that's what Ghostbuster Ray Stantz thought. In this "First Look" post, we'll review the first image of Ecto 1 ever. Above is a snapshot of the Ecto 1 while still in black gray primer. The scene begins with Ray driving Ecto 1 with the lights and sirens on. He parks it at the door in front of the firehouse. Peter Venkman is standing out in the street supervising the guys who are putting the sign on the building. Ray jumps out of the car and proclaims that no one needs to worry, he's found the car. Then he starts a rant of all the attention the car needs. Dr Ray Stantz: [gets out] Everybody can relax, I found the car. Needs some suspension work and shocks. Brakes, brake pads, lining, steering box, transmission, rear-end. Dr. Peter Venkman: How much? Dr Ray Stantz: Only $4800. [Venkman looks shocked] Dr Ray Stantz: Also new rings, mufflers, a little wiring. A Little Work? A little work? I would classify that as a bit more than a "little work." Note that Ray didn't mention any body work, a paint job, a new light bar and all the ghostbusting equipment. Brake Pads? I didn't realize he said that till recently. But most of these cars had drum brakes all around. It may require brake shoes, but not brake pads. Only $4800 bucks? $4800 bucks today is like $9900 today. At the time of the film, the car would have been around 25 years old. How many of you, would pay almost ten grand for a 25 year old car? I guess it would depend on the vehicle. The primer version of the car used in this scene is a work of art. According to the Ghostbuster Wiki, the black car is the base for the Ecto 1A used in Ghostbusters II. I love how the front and rear tires don't match, there are some missing hub caps, and the big radio antenna whip isn't on the car. As a kid, I thought the tied back antenna was a factory detail for the Miller Meteor Caddy Ambulance. From the research I've done, that is not the case. The warning lights are basic compared to modern emergency vehicles. I haven't seen another ambulance with both red and green lights. Final Thoughts I like the primer version of Ecto 1 almost as much as the finished version. I think a 59' Caddy Ambulance would make a very interesting rat rod, although I haven't seen any as of yet. But, I'm sure, some where out there someone has ratted one out. What are your thoughts about the black primer Ecto 1? Tell us about your first impressions of Ecto 1. Feel free to comment about those things, while we work on the next On Screen Cars post! Just In: Rumor has it, that the Hot-Wheels Ecto-1 is due out this month! I'll be keeping my eye out for it. Not just a rumor anymore! It's available through our store! Reference: IMDB, Ghostbuster Wiki, ProtonCharging.com